All respiratory masks suck. Except for this one

By Ian Chow / 2013-11-13
Source: Explorations

I’m not a man to give reviews very easily, unless it was bad… or spectacularly amazing. And this one is it, amazing. I’m talking about the Totobobo Mask, of course.

After a few years of use, it was about time I had written something more significant.

My Criterias: Light, Not hot, breathes easy, and non invasive
When I was still working in South Korea, spring time was also a time for a phenomenon called “Yellow Dust“. Fine particles of sand specs picks up from the Gobi desert, collects air pollution as it travels through China and then dumps it in Korea. This can also last throughout the summer. Needless to say, I got sick a lot during the spring. Finally, I had enough and decided to look for a good mask. My criteria was that 1) Was light 2) Not hot 3) Breathes really easily 4) Non-invasive

Climbing with Totobobo mask
Climbing with Totobobo mask

You can rock climb with it!
After searching awhile online, reading reviews, I found that most other masks were lacking in atleast one of these criterias. Some were made of neoprene, some were “good” but once the filter goes on, it’s very hard to breath, and some were just a huge thing in your face. Just as I was about to give up, I found Totobobo Mask.

They matched all my criteria.

Light
This mask is incredibly light. You can even mash it up, fold it in your pocket and carry it around with you. No harm will come to this mask.

Not hot
Despite scorching 36 degrees and 110% humidity, the mask doesn’t make it any hotter when you breath into it. Ok, a little bit, but despite that I’m a sweaty guy, (I use a sweat band that channels sweat instead of a sweat absorber in high cardio exercises in the summer) the mask doesn’t really make that much of a difference.

Breathes Easy
Yeah, as I said, I do lots of sports outdoors. And so breathing hard into this mask is no problem. The air flow doesn’t really slow down. It does a bit, but not that significant.

Non-invasive
Once I got it, I started wearing it riding my bike to work. And wouldn’t you know, I didn’t sound like someone who had been smoking for 10 years and you can see the physical debris of dirt that gets caught up in the filters. Not only do I ride my bike with it to work, I also rock climbed with it. It never got in the way.

After using it for biking and rock climbing, I had brought it to India and Nepal. Even just sitting in the rickshaws in Nepal for 20 minutes, I had realized my mask is completely filthy and needed a filter change. With good foresight, I had bought a lot of filters.

Some other cool features?

30 minutes in a can in Kathmandu, Nepal
30 minutes in a can in Kathmandu, Nepal

Filters
How good are these filters? Well, if you don’t know what N95 is, that is pretty much the standard for “The American National Standard for Air Purifying Respiratory”. This means it filters out practically every airborne pollution, which refers to 95% of the pollution. Also, I ended up getting N96 filters too!

Changeable filters, renewable everything! Less waste!
Unlike other masks where you have to throw out the entire thing and get a new one, Totobobo only throws out the filters. This produces a lot less garbage and being environmentally aware, I feel a lot less guilty doing this. To be honest, I didn’t think this was a thing I’d really like about it, but it has grown on me. Recently doing lots of construction work, I’ve been throwing out and purchasing a lot more face masks than I feel was necessary. This changed everything

In a nutshell
Get it. My lungs and health significantly got better, you can see the pollution being filtered out, it’s not invasive, not hot, light, easy to wear and reusable. There are so many pro’s about this one filter! I’m very happy with it and you should totally get one, by clicking right here!

 

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Why do you choose Totobobo mask (2)

bobo – a piece of cloud to bring back the fresh air from good old days

“bobo” is the name designer Francis Chu given to his latest contraption which will be showcased in the National Museum of Singapore next month, along with 18 other product designers from Singapore. All designers are part of a local collective called “Little Thoughts Group”. The exhibition called Imprints- Designing from Memories” is sponsored by the National Heritage Board of Singapore. All exhibits derive from local heritage and demonstrate how designers cohere their childhood memories with their skills in designing to come up with new and innovative ideas for modern day living.

bobo is a cloud shape air purifier which doubles up as lighting. It makes use of high tech filters from TotoboboMask® to purify polluted air. At night, bobo also illuminates the surrounding with growling light as if the moon is shining behind the cloud, providing relax, serene atmosphere. There are altogether eight unique “bobo”s presented in the exhibition, all in different sizes and shapes. Each “bobo” is labelled with a Chinese name which can be seen when the light is on.

In the designer’s own words:

“ Inspiration of bobo came form my childhood memories. As a curious kid I was fascinated how clouds change and move across the sky. I enjoy spontaneous imagination triggered by the changing patterns. e.g. a white rabbit slowly morphing into a huge snail or an airplane suddenly changed to a dancing dragon. Free from computer games and traffic pollutions, those were the days that life was simpler and air was cleaner. The design intent of bobo is to bring back the clean air and memory of those simple days.”

bobo-cloud filter is patent pending, the project is sponsored by Totobobo Mask®

About the exhibition: Imprints: Designing From Memories
Following its successful first-of-its kind product design exhibition in Singapore last year, the Little Thoughts Group is geared up once again to showcase the creative talents of local product designers in December 2010 at the National Museum of Singapore.

“Imprints: Designing from Memories” features a significant collaboration with the National Heritage Board, as the theme will revolve around the exploration of heritage and culture in product design and the notion of “Singapore Design”.

The upcoming exhibition boasts an even more impressive showcase which will comprise the works of 19 local product designers. Spurred on by encouraging reviews of the last show, this year’s showcase promises to be even more awesome and inspiring, with its ‘blast from the past’ take.

4th Dec 2010 – 1st Jan 2011
10am – 6pm daily
The Atelier Gallery
National Museum of Singapore