Used filters from India

“The mask is fantastic. I probably get a very faint smell of emissions in the peak scenario but generally the performance has been excellent… Definitely great value for money…” – Ganesh from Bangalore, India.

Ganesh sent a pair of used filter from India
Ganesh sent a pair of used filter from India

Ganesh cycle to work path is about 11km. Since December 4th, 2008 he has been testing his new Totobobo mask. Over a period of 2 weeks, he clocked 129 km in 425 minutes of riding. Approximately 25% of the time was “off peak” hours. He is very pleased with the result. To him getting a whiff of clean air behind a smoking bus is really refreshing for a change!

The Bangalore test

“Rohan is glad that the dirt is collected on the filter, not in his lung.”

used filter (200km) vs new

Used filter (200km) vs new

Rohan Kini, an online bicycle shop owner in Bangalore, India, was testing a new pollution mask. After 200 km of bicycling in the city, he was very impressed with the performance of a new mask call TOTOBOBO from Singapore and decided to carry it in his shop.

The air pollution in London is nowhere near Bangalore standards. However, riding in heavy traffic can damage the respiratory system. The question is: How does one know if a pollution mask is needed or not?

The latest TOTOBOBO mask won’t be able to tell that in advance. But you can be pretty sure when it does the job – simply by checking out the color of the filters. The filter will turn into a distinguish dirty gray to signal that it’s time to change the filters.

The mask is ergonomically designed to fit the majority of faces, from adult down to children of age 5! The secret is in a world’s first “customizable” feature which allows you to trim the mask smaller if it is too big for you.

This reusable, flat folding little gadget may just be the right thing to keep in your pocket when you brave the urban traffic.

more:� BumOnTheSaddle

PS. Totobobo filter uses special electro-static charge to collect even sub-micron dust.

 

TOTOBOBO and cycling

Say No to Pollution in School Bus

School bus in USA
School bus in USA

Every day, half a million school buses safely carry 24 million American children to school, field trips and athletic events.

Unfortunately, most buses are powered by diesel engines that actually pollute the air inside the bus. Studies show the pollution gets trapped inside the bus, where kids breathe it in.
Soot from two sources

Pollution come from emissions from the tailpipe and from the engine. Engine emissions (also referred to as crankcase emissions) enter the school bus cabin mostly through the door and the floorboard.

Because the door is right near the engine, engine emissions get sucked into the school bus, every time the door opens.
Unhealthy diesel exhaust

Diesel engines spew out nearly 40 toxic substances, smog-forming emissions and particulate matter (PM), better known as soot. Coarse and fine particles (PM10 and PM2.5) are breathed deeply into the lungs where they can lodge, creating serious, even life-threatening health problems (more on the health effects of soot and the problem with diesel).

Children are at particular risk because their lungs are still developing. Kids also breathe two times more air per pound of body weight than adults do. The damage to young lungs can result in reduced lung function by adulthood and other dangerous health problems.

Particle Pollution Health Risks

aggravated asthma
lung inflammation
heart problems
possible cancer
premature death

Children receive an extra dose of pollution twice a day

pollution in school bus
pollution in school bus

Children riding buses older than 2007 models receive an extra dose of pollution on each ride: monitoring shows that the diesel pollution inside a typical school bus can be up to five times higher than the outside air.

Unless your childs school bus has been retrofitted with a filter or your child is riding on a brand new 2007 school bus, chances are, your child is breathing in unhealthy pollution levels.
Solutions are at hand

Science indicates that even short-term exposure to elevated particulate levels can have detrimental health effects. The good news is that children do not have to be exposed to diesel school bus pollution. Cost-effective solutions are available. Four Steps to Cleaner Buses.
To cut harmful soot pollution by 90 percent, a bus can be replaced with a new 2007 engine model year bus or retrofitted with a filtering device on the tailpipe, called a diesel particulate filter (DPF).

Engine emissions can easily be eliminated with a crankcase ventilation system (CCVS). A CCVS reroutes the engine emissions to the engine air intake preventing harmful emissions from escaping into the air and the bus cabin.

While working on the long term solution, the immediate action you may take is to install a personal filter (face mask) for your children. However, a surgical mask is useless since the airborne particulates can easily bypass the mask and enter the breathing zone through the gaps. N95 respirator is not available for children because NIOSH never certify any for use on children. Luckily TOTOBOBO mask is now available and it is the first fitting mask designed with the need of children in mind. Even though it is not certified, it is easy to see how it seal the small faces of children. There is even a choice of two different filters; 96% or 94%. The 96% provide higher protection level than N95 mask, and the 94% is only 1% less than N95 mask and has very low breathing resistance.

Reference reading: CLEAN SCHOOL BUS
Idle School bus may be harming your child’s lung

Read more about TOTOBOBO mask for children :

The best fitting mask for children

Say no to pollution in school buses

time for a better mask for children

protect children from incense smoke

How to’s

How to customize TOTOBOBO mask for your children?

How to wash TOTOBOBO mask for reuse?

How to check the mask-to-face-seal without fit-test equipment?

Buy TOTOBOBO mask for children


Mohit recommends Totobobo mask

What are cyclists looking for in a pollution mask?
We have put special consideration to a number of applications when designing TOTOBOBO mask. Following are the list for cyclists.

Mohit from India recommends Totobobo mask. His has been using his trusty Totobobo mask for the last 10 years!
Thank you Mohit!

Burning Joss Sticks can cause Cancer

Ian MacKinnon in Bangkok Wednesday July 30 2008

offering incense in a temple

Burning joss sticks lit as an offering in shrines and temples fill the air with cancer-causing toxins that are every bit as deadly as traffic fumes and cigarette smoke, says Dr Manoon Leechawengwong.

Dr Manoon, who has just completed a two-year study of temple workers tasked with clearing the smouldering sticks, found the cocktail of chemicals in the smoke put them at risk of leukaemia, lung, blood and bladder cancers.

“One joss stick creates the same amount of cancer-causing chemicals at one cigarette,” said Dr Manoon, who led the research. “I knew there would be some carcinogens, but I was surprised by the levels.”

Joss sticks are a type of incense used in worship in many Asian countries. In Buddhism they are believed to aid spiritual communication and serve as an offering.

Dr Manoon’s study was conducted among 40 workers in three temples at Ayutthaya, Chachoengsao and Samut Prakan, sites chosen deliberately far from Bangkok’s traffic pollution. The findings were compared with another 25 people living in a joss-stick free environment.


Temple workers were exposed to high levels of benzene, also known as petroleum ether, related to leukaemia; butadiene involved in blood cancer; and benzo[a]pyrene that can cause lung, bladder and skin cancers.

The level of benzene in the temple workers was four times higher than normal, butadiene was 260 times higher, and benzo[a]pyrene – the most dangerous carcinogen – 63 times greater.

Analysis of the temple workers blood and urine samples discovered damage to their DNA, with a correspondingly lower capacity of their bodies to repair that damage.

“We know from our study that there’s DNA damage,” said Dr Manoon. “But what we don’t know is if they will develop cancer. Certainly they have a greater risk. It’s like smoking. Not all smokers get cancer, it’s about 20% .”

Source

——–

Blogger Fong Yoong Kheong offers the following practical solutions:

Solution 1 : Open Windows to ensure proper air flow, so as to reduce the amount that you have to breathe in.

Solution 2 : Wear a N95 Mask or Chemical Protection Mask. Like most people, he thought this will be simple. Just don a mask to prevent the inhalation of toxic substances. But unless you have a fit test equipment and do a proper fit-test, the assurance of protection can be an illusion.

Solution 3 : Learn from SAF – Simulate the smoke. (I really like this one)

Solution 4 : Install the Urn outside your house

Solution 5 : Buy premium grade Incense. They cost much higher but they are made of premium grade of wood and does not release toxic smoke.

Source

Cycling through Asia without pollution

Herve and Goska of Develotour pioneered an interesting way to measure and visualize air pollution. On a yearlong bicycle trek across the continent, the couple traveled through several Asian countries. They visited a number of major Asian metropolises and experienced firsthand their respective air qualities. In each locale they wore TOTOBOBO filtration masks to protect their lungs from the polluted air. Every six hours they changed the filter. By the end of their trip they had a visual demonstration of the relative air quality of the cities they had visited, thanks to the filter in their TOTOBOBO mask.

Across the Indian subcontinent and southeast Asia, air quality was horrifically poor, in cities and the countryside alike. Airborne particulates, even when not plainly visible, abounded. Without the masks breathing was laborious, but with the TOTOBOBO mask breathing the polluted air was much more comfortable.
For extended periods of time the mask was comfortable even during the intense workout of a day-long bike ride. One downside (due largely to the high humidity of the climate) was the accumulation of moisture inside the mask.

Cycling in sand storm

Displayed below is an image of the air filters from various cities on their journey. Those particles that remained in the filter would have entered Herve and Goskas lungs without proper filtration. The gradation in filthiness indicates the grave state of air pollution in the given cities. Without protective masks, continuous exposure to poor air quality causes serious pulmonary diseases and disorders. In China and India especially, where horrific air quality meets the worlds greatest populations, this is a matter of great concern.
After their trip Herve and Goska spread air pollution awareness by lecturing to university and grade school students about the state of air quality across the worlds most populated regions:

Filter visualize air pollution across Asia

Related:

How to choose a pollution mask for cyclist?

How to clean TOTOBOBO mask for reuse?

Beijing: dirty on the outside, clean on the inside?

The Bangalore test

Your masks are very useful in India, thanks!