Totobobo India Distributor : Purita

Consumers in India, we have great news for you. We have noticed the rising number of purchasers in the recent years, however the time taken to ship the masks over is quite long, which can be frustrating for you. We are now happy to announce our first Official Distributor of Totobobo Mask in India! Link is below

Purita is a healthcare start-up funded by Singapore Based Investors. They provide ergonomically designed and super-efficient patented technologies of air purifiers, to provide you healthiest living spaces.

As per the recent reports, air pollution has reached crisis levels in Northern India and though it is much publicised in Delhi, it is also widespread in many other cities and as many as ten of the top 20 most polluted cities in the world are in India.

3rd Party Reviews on Totobobo Mask

It is important to study a product carefully before buying it, one of the most important things to take note of are the comments made by other consumers who have purchased the same product. To save you the trouble, we have done up a compilation of the different reviews we have gotten over the years from external sources, therefore they are trustworthy and not made up by us!

(Tips: click on the images below to jump to the sources)

Via News

Totobobo mask on Wall Street Journal

Debra Bruno, a freelance journalist and a jogger in Beijing explains her choice of Totobobo mask to the Wall Street Journal during an interview

“This filter was white when I started and it got this nasty grey after only 10km.” Chas Pope – Marathon runner

“The filters show up an astonishing amount of dirt after just a few cycles, which really hits home how dirty the air we breathe in is. It’s easy to attach and I can move my face when wearing it – a bonus.”

“Tipping the scales at 20g, Totobobo is the lightest reusable respiratory mask on the market. “

“The white filter pads make it easy – and incredibly satisfying – to monitor the particulates that have been caught  “

“There was a visible change in the colour of the filters, and I was more aware of the visible dust being kicked up by trucks and was grateful I wasn’t inhaling this. I suffer from hay fever and could imagine the mask would be a huge benefit in reducing the symptoms. “Chris Lima, a member of IoD Oxfordshire

via avid traveller:

“We have started using our Totobobo masks, and changed the filters for the first time after 7 days of usage in Malaysia, plagued by the haze coming from Indonesia. So far we are satisfied, it works well and the filters are getting grey as expected!” Davide Vadalà and Oti from Nomad Travellers

“it is a well-designed, super lightweight mask that allows me to freely breathe as I wheel around town.” Sahn

via cyclist:

“Totobobo mask has a good feature where you can customize the mask (and the ear loop) by reshaping it with hot water / hair dryer. This is a very crucial feature, a mask that do not fit your face is not an effective mask at all.”

“Given how dirty the pads get, I can only assume this mask is blocking out plenty of pollution. The mask itself is soft and doesn’t rub, even when sweaty.”

via Runner:

PrisChew

“Totobobo mask is also comfortable to wear and easy to breathe with. So it is commonly used by cyclists, motorcyclists and artists when navigating around in polluted environments.” Pris Chew, runner blogger

via artist:

via health sites:

“Aside from an amazing name, this mask is interesting for its design – it gets moulded to your face (using warm water) for a good fit, and when worn, is transparent where it’s in contact with your skin, and translucent otherwise. This means that you can just stand in front of the mirror and ensure that you’ve gotten a good seal on the mask.”

Clean Living Blog

“In other masks, there is no way to find out if it is tightly fitted on the face. Totobobo has solved this problem using an innovative ‘water-mark’ technique in which the frosted surface of the mask becomes transparent where there is good skin contact and remains translucent where there is a leakage.”

“the mask itself is more environmentally friendly. You only throw the filters away – not the entire mask. “

“This is the only mask I’ve been able to get used to. “

“As soon as I take it off, I’m aware of how much pastel is on and around me by just breathing (it’s scary to think I was breathing all that dust before!)”

More related links:
https://totobobo.com/blog/2012/08/why-do-you-choose-totobobo-mask-2/

Jackie Simmonds review Totobobo mask

Pastel painting by Jackie Simmonds
Pastel painting by Jackie Simmonds

If you are interested in pastel painting, you will be interested in this blog called “Jackie Simmonds Artyfacts”. Jackie Simmonds, an artist, art instruction author, tutor. Her prints published and distributed worldwide. She is also a regular contributor to the popular Artist Magazine in UK.

We are very pleased that Jackie recently posted a review of Totobobo mask and she is now a regular user of Totobobo because she like it a lot!

She explained why a dust mask is necessary:
“There are two fundamental characteristics of the pastel medium that make it dangerous to inhale: the small particle size of the dust and the toxicity of the pigments. Pastel dust consists of extremely fine particles of both pigments and binders. When the dust is inhaled, some particles will deposit in the upper respiratory system. But more harmfully, a significant portion of the pastel dust particles, especially those from pigments, are small enough to get deep into the lungs air sacs (alveoli), where they may remain indefinitely.”

Then she went on to talk about Totobobo mask:
“I tried various masks, and felt claustrophobic in most of them. Then, I read about the TOTOBOBO mask, used by other pastellists. I now own one of these masks, and use it regularly. I thought I would mention it here, and give you the link to the website where you can view a variety of pictures, you can even download a mask simulator which will give you an idea whether the mask would fit your face or not, and you can read a variety of reviews.”

Click here to read more at her blog.

Totobobo, the best mask for artist?

Starting from 2009, pastel artist Paula Ford started to use Totobobo mask, because she developed a breathing problem after painting with soft pastel.
“I could hardly breathe, and my eyes have been running, red and itchy all the time whether I’m painting or not”. She wrote in her blog.

After several unsuccessful attempts with other masks Paula found Totobobo via Google. She was so happy with the performance of Totobobo that she started recommending to her fellow artists. She is now one of Totobobo reseller in the States. Not everyone is good at searching the net, but many do have a similar problem like Paula and can benefit from knowing there is a simple solution like Totobobo.

We did a search on pastel artist and Totobobo mask and was surprised at the number of recommendation within the community: (link, quote)

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DAK723 WC Forum Guide Rochester, NY

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=567271
“Recently, based on a thread started by Paula Ford, I purchased the Totobobo dust mask. I thought I would share my review.

The first thing I noticed was that there seemed to be more air coming through the Totobobo mask than the previous mask that I have been using (3M #8210). In fact, I took the mask off to check and make sure the filters were in place, because there was no noticeable decrease in air flow! (Yes, the filters were in place!) The mask seems lighter, too.

The straps were more comfortable than the 3M #8210 mask, and even better, they are adjustable. You can tighten or loosen them with a little clip that is attached to the strap.

The mask seems to do a fine job – no coughing or clearing my throat after working with the pastels.

One of the nice things about it is that the filters detach and are replaceable, so the mask itself is more environmentally friendly. You only throw the filters away – not the entire mask. The filters will probably last a good long time, I guess I don’t know how long yet! I’ve used it twice and the filters aren’t dirty at all.

One thing that you might need to do, is make some “homemade adjustments” to ensure the mask is tight against the side of your nose – so that the air does not escape through there. Paula contacted Totobobo and was instructed to cut a filter in half and place a piece on either side of the nose. I ended up doing something different – I cut a small groove at the top of the mask for the bridge of my nose (which, apparently, is larger than the average totobobo mask user!). It worked fine, and when I wear the mask, it does not fog up my glasses!

So, that’s my review and I definitely recommend this mask. I know many of you are hesitant about wearing a mask, and believe me, so was I. In fact, I pretty much had to give up pastels for about 20 years, only doing them occasionally and then stopping due to coughing issues. Finally, I decided that using a mask was something I could get used to – and I did. I think it would have been an easier decision if this mask had been available then. It seems very unobtrusive compared to the others.

If you are looking to get one, I highly recommend buying one ”
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Adriane Meiss Syracuse, NY

This is the only mask I’ve been able to get used to. I had to cut it to the first mark for it to produce a good seal. Most important of all, is that it doesn’t fog my glasses! Yeah!
It does leave marks on my face, so I’ll have to learn to adjust it correctly.

As soon as I take it off, I’m aware of how much pastel is on and around me by just breathing (it’s scary to think I was breathing all that dust before!), so next time I’ll blow the pastel away with a fan before removing it.

Thank you Paula for sharing this great product with us! (I’m not associated with that company in any way )
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http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=806331
chuas2 San Francisco

About the dust; all pastels are going to generate some dust. I use a lot of hard pastels and pastel pencils, which are somewhat less dusty, but still when I’m doing large areas or brushing out errors, I use Paula Ford’s “totobobo” mask. It’s really comfortable and you’ll be able to see in the filters what would have gone into your lungs. Not good!

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http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=926264
saramathewson Sunny Southwest
The other thing that I don’t always remember but am working on it is using a mask. I used to always use the paper throw away kind but recently bought a “Totobobo mask” If you search for Paula Ford, she sells them. I don’t sell them or have anything to do with the company but they are nice and inexpensive and you don’t have to keep throwing them away, you just replace the two filters in the mask and they come with extras. You can also cut it to fit your face if it is too big to begin with. It is a nice mask that allows you to wear glasses without them fogging up constantly! And like I said very inexpensive for a more permanent mask.

Like I said I don’t have anything to do with the company, I just own one and like it so thought I would share. I think Paula just sells them because she also likes them and wanted them to be available to other pastelists. I don’t think she really makes any money on them to be honest.
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http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=559350
Paula Ford WC Forum Guide Jasper, TN
“I wanted to tell you about my recent struggle with breathing. For the last couple of months I’ve been having a hard breathing after painting. I don’t think I was blowing on my work, but was tapping the excess pastel into the trash every few minutes. Well, it was getting into the air so much, by the end of the night of painting, I could hardly breathe, and my eyes have been running, red and itchy all the time whether I’m painting or not.

So, I came here to WC and did a search for “masks” and decided, after much research and trial and error with other masks that I bought at Lowes or WalMart, that I’d purchase the Totobobo mask.

Let me first I am not associated with the makers of the Totobobo mask. I just feel strongly about what I am about to tell you. This mask may have saved my life.

First, the mask is made out of a rubbery material, so it sticks naturally to your skin. It is a bit tricky to learn how to put it on, but once you’ve got it, you’ve got it. At first, there was a slight gap near the nose area and I could feel the air coming in around my nose, so I wrote to the makers of this mask and they responded very quickly and told me what to do and it worked perfectly! Since I found the perfect position on my face for my mask, I no longer have any problems with breathing…at all…period. My nose has cleared up, my eyes are no longer irritated, I don’t cough or sneeze at all any more. And, it’s comfortable! I hardly know I’m wearing it!

I feel it has given me the freedom to continue using my pastels. Oh my gosh, I could NOT imagine not painting with pastels. My heart would just die!

So, I’m hear to tell you, if you EVER have any breathing problems due to pastel dust, please buy this mask. It will make all the difference in the world and it may just save your life.

Take care of yourself and love yourself enough to prevent any future problems. There is only one of you and you are the only one that can keep yourself healthy.

Love & Hugs,
Paula”
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http://brendaboylan.blogspot.com/2011/01/time-lapse-movie-passing-point.html
Brenda Boylen
You may notice in these small productions that I wear some sort of mask on my face. Protecting my lungs from the airborne pastel dust is serious business. I’ve tried heavy ventilators and they don’t fit my small featured face. I’ve tried 3M, and a few other disposable face masks, but it seemed like they were not protecting me enough. For my own health I searched high and low for a small, comfortable, and highly effective filter and found another pastel artist, Paula Ford using a Totobobo. Artist’s are always at risk by their mediums, especially soft pastel dust! I wanted to bring this up because recently my favorite online blogger friend Loriann underwent lung surgery and so I wanted her to see that she too, can continue working in pastel! I still have to gently wipe up any remaining dust with a damp rag to keep from getting airborne. I’m not sponsored by Totbobo, but I certainly do encourage pastel artists to check them out for their own health.

What pastel artist and blogger Brenda Boylan thinks about using the Totobobo mask to protect herself?


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Passing Point, 24x24

Sometimes the most powerful testimonial comes in very unexpected way.

Pastel artist Brenda Boylan make a point to show that she is wearing Totobobo mask when producing a time lapse video showing how a beautiful pastel painting was created. Here is what she has to say about Totobobo:

You may notice in these small productions that I wear some sort of mask on my face. Protecting my lungs from the airborne pastel dust is serious business. I’ve tried heavy ventilators and they don’t fit my small featured face. I’ve tried 3M, and a few other disposable face masks, but it seemed like they were not protecting me enough. For my own health I searched high and low for a small, comfortable, and highly effective filter and found another pastel artist, Paula Ford using a Totobobo. Artist’s are always at risk by their mediums, especially soft pastel dust! I wanted to bring this up because recently my favorite online blogger friend Loriann underwent lung surgery and so I wanted her to see that she too, can continue working in pastel! I still have to gently wipe up any remaining dust with a damp rag to keep from getting airborne. I’m not sponsored by Totobobo, but I certainly do encourage pastel artists to check them out for their own health.

Still not convinced? read other’s comments on Brenda’s blog “Dusty Fingers

Kimberly Vanlandingham said…

Masks are so important! I got Pneumonia when I was in college and they think it was triggered by dust from glazing particles. I had a really big scare even though we didn’t use any of the “dangerous” glazes in school.

loriann said…
Hi Brenda,

I loved watching you at work and yes I see your totobobo. On another note,do you find that by painting on a toned surface it imbues that color light?I love your work.
Thanks for turning me on to the Totobobo. And thanks for taking the time to discuss, by phone, about the toto. Now I have that and my artist’s air filter. I am beginning to feel safe.
Thanks also for your kind mention.
Loriann
PS Now my husband uses a totobobo when he is cleaning the cat litter box- 5 cats lots of floating matter.

bobo prototype test run

bobo is a new room air purifier concept based on the same filter technology of Totobobo mask. A unique feature of bobo allow it to double up as a diffused light, easy on the eye when use as a reading lamp. It is particularly suitable for the bedroom of children with asthma or sensitive respiratory track.

We are completing 8 functional prototypes to be exhibit in the Singapore National Museum. The public exhibition “Imprints: Designing from memories” will start from December 4th and end by the 2nd of January 2011.

bobo No.2  - Easy treasure  (??)

bobo a piece of cloud to bring back the fresh air from good old days

bobo is the name designer Francis Chu given to his latest contraption which will be showcased in the National Museum of Singapore next month, along with 18 other product designers from Singapore. All designers are part of a local collective called Little Thoughts Group. The exhibition called Imprints- Designing from Memories is sponsored by the National Heritage Board of Singapore. All exhibits derive from local heritage and demonstrate how designers cohere their childhood memories with their skills in designing to come up with new and innovative ideas for modern day living.

bobo is a cloud shape air purifier which doubles up as lighting. It makes use of high tech filters from TotoboboMask to purify polluted air. At night, bobo also illuminates the surrounding with growling light as if the moon is shining behind the cloud, providing relax, serene atmosphere. There are altogether eight unique bobos presented in the exhibition, all in different sizes and shapes. Each “bobo” is labelled with a Chinese name which can be seen when the light is on.

In the designer’s own words:

Inspiration of bobo came form my childhood memories. As a curious kid I was fascinated how clouds change and move across the sky. I enjoy spontaneous imagination triggered by the changing patterns. e.g. a white rabbit slowly morphing into a huge snail or an airplane suddenly changed to a dancing dragon. Free from computer games and traffic pollutions, those were the days that life was simpler and air was cleaner. The design intent of bobo is to bring back the clean air and memory of those simple days.

bobo-cloud filter is patent pending, the project is sponsored by Totobobo Mask

About the exhibition: Imprints: Designing From Memories
Following its successful first-of-its kind product design exhibition in Singapore last year, the Little Thoughts Group is geared up once again to showcase the creative talents of local product designers in December 2010 at the National Museum of Singapore.

“Imprints: Designing from Memories” features a significant collaboration with the National Heritage Board, as the theme will revolve around the exploration of heritage and culture in product design and the notion of “Singapore Design”.

The upcoming exhibition boasts an even more impressive showcase which will comprise the works of 19 local product designers. Spurred on by encouraging reviews of the last show, this year’s showcase promises to be even more awesome and inspiring, with its ‘blast from the past’ take.

4th Dec 2010 – 1st Jan 2011
10am – 6pm daily
The Atelier Gallery
National Museum of Singapore

Lasalle-Sia College Of The Arts

Front facet of Laselle-Sia School of the Arts
Front facet of Laselle-Sia School of the Arts

Yesterday we had a fruitful meeting with some of the staff in Lasalle-Sia College of the Arts. We were there to brief them about the Art & Crafts application of Totobobo mask. We were surprised and impressed when their technical officer approached us last week. This demonstrates the progressive nature of the school – a sign that their staff is actively seeking solution to address the safety issue relates to their students.

Established in 2004 as part of LASALLE College of the Arts, the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) Singapore is devoted to the research and exhibition of international and Asian contemporary visual arts, media arts and design.
the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) Singapore, the galleries and part of LASALLE College of the Arts.

LASALLE offers the most comprehensive range of 26 diploma and degree awards in design, fine arts, film, media arts, fashion, dance, music, theatre, art history, art therapy and arts management in the region. In some of the practical classes, like painting, sculpture and welding, students may be exposed to harmful particles or gases. Currently there isn’t a really practical solution. Professional respirators are too big and heavy and expensive as well for the students. The typical solution is surgical mask, which is not sufficiently protective. We shared how other artists and craftsmen had successfully used Totobobo mask to protect themselves during their work. We also demonstrated how the mask can be customised to fit different face sizes of the students. They were clearly impressed by the flexibility of Totobobo and invited us for another presentation to their students.

Two types of Totobobo- Original adjustable strap and earloop
Two types of Totobobo- Original adjustable strap and earloop

We brought two types of Totobobo to the school: original and earloop. Being asked whether the flimsy looking strap will easily break, we were eager to demonstrate howstretchableit is.. So we puuuull ——- SNAP! One of the straps from the earloop just pop out right in front of us. We were extremelyembarrassedand overwhelmed because we dedicate tremendous efforts to keep a good quality standard. After inspection, it was discovered that the strap survives the stretch, but the end connector gave way.

We decided to recall all the earloop models and is in the process contacting those affected customers. The production of the earloop model had been stopped until a solution for the problem is identified.

Related article:
MAAD fun with Totobobo mask